Friday, July 30, 2010

Vtg McCall 5600

Here's McCall 5600, a mid-1940s blouse pattern:


It is SUCH a sweet little blouse! I love it! I made my version in a white spotted voile, nearly a dead ringer for the cover illustration. I made View B, with the yoke from View A.


View B has a separate pattern piece for the yoke, a straight piece with darts marked to miter a straight piece of lace or ribbon to create the yoke. Very clever! View A has a traditional square-shaped yoke piece that is self-fabric faced. I love the gathered center front! I needed no alteration to this pattern other than scooting the CF away from the fold 1.5" to allow for a bit of an FBA.


The yoke is applied to the bodice front/back by turning under the seam allowance on the yoke, then topstitching in place. I see this technique all the time on 1930s and 1940s patterns. There were so many interesting seams in that era, and using this technique would be the easiest way to achieve intricate seaming. Here's a closeup of the topstitching:


The facing is then handstitched to the inside, covering the seam.


The back bodice has a small, faced placket. The placket & facing square are slit, stitched along the edge of the slit, then the facing turned in. Edges are turned under and topstitched. Very simple and actually very pretty! There is a loop & button closure at the neckline.


I used a vintage white rhinestone center button. It's just faded and "old" enough to make me very happy to see it at the back neck! Hopefully the rhinestone doesn't fall out the first time I handwash this blouse! (I have spare rhinestones, no worries!) My blanket-stitched button loop is just sad. I'll be cutting it off and redoing it shortly. I'm out of practice!


There are tiny turned up hems at the sleeves and hem. I did not gather and apply the binding to the short, puffed sleeve. It was a last minute decision because I thought the fluttery effect was well suited to this voile blouse.


I will say the center front gathering does have the slightest maternity look if untucked. But the fabric is lightweight enough that it does not pouf out in the least. I've already worn it! I wore it to the movies last night with my buddy StickGirl. I didn't get a photo of it on, but I'll try to get one in the next couple of days. I spilled coffee on it getting in the car for the ride home of course! So it's already been handwashed and needs pressed again.

Love, Love Love this. I can see more in my future! One of the things I've been learning from my vintage pattern endeavors, is to slow down and pay attention to the experience of creating garments. There are so many little bits of sewing information and techniques that require you to take your time or at least put a little though into them.

For example, carefully pressing under the seam allowance of the yoke with precision so that it matches the seamline of the blouse, or creating a blanket-stitched thread loop by hand. Every few steps in the instructions there is reason for me to pause and take my time in the creation process.

Nothing I've encountered has been difficult or, to be honest, better replaced by a more modern technique. In fact, I find I'm preferring the vintage techniques over modern shortcuts.

Next, I've got to finish a couple of skirts! I have 5 days of summer vacation left and I plan to make the most of them! One more parting shot of my pretty, vintage blouse:


I'll be cross-posting at We Sew Vintage!

22 comments:

  1. That is such a pretty top. I love it. I also loved reading about how you put it together and pictures of same. I feel vintage patterns are easier to follow. That one is a keeper!!

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  2. I love it! A lawn print would be great if you use it again.

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  3. I love it! I adore the fabric choice, so feminine. I for some reason am drawn to white blouses all of a sudden. With kids around constantly, (not to mention my accident prone self) this may not be a good thing.

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  4. I love the top, too. I imagine that you look terrific wearing it. Yep, Whenever I wear a white blouse, I spill something on it. It's one of those "rules" I guess.

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  5. It's gorgeous, I love the fabric. Thank you for the detailed pics:)

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  6. Well done! Looks breezy and comfy and the fabric is perfect.

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  7. Super cute! Love the dotted swiss and white is sure to get tons of use. The good thing about white is that it's bleachable.

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  8. The perfect fabric for a perfect pattern. Very feminine and summery.

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  9. Lovely, lovely blouse, well worth making again! It looks cool and comfortable for lazy, hot summer days, and pretty for summer evenings with friends.

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  10. Oh, my! It is so very pretty! I love it!

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  11. That top is so pretty - the fabric is perfect for this lovely vintage style and it looks beautifully made.

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  12. White is my favorite color! I would wear white all day every day if I could!

    Angie - I just want to say that you are inspiration to my sewing. I think you have wonderful taste, lots of skill, and a great eye for incorporating vintage into your every day. I also really value when you photograph yourself in your creations. Your figure and personality do them justice like nothing else can. For all of us sewers out there, especially those like me with fuller figures to accommodate, I hope you know you are an inspiration and a muse. Keep it up!

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  13. This floating style looks wonderfully modern to me. I'm going to look through my vintage pattern stash for just this type of detail.

    I'm so very glad to have found your blog - thank you for sharing.

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  14. So all your clothes are made specially to keep your trees from feeling naked? Is that it? You make nice clothes for those trees, that's for sure.

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  15. I love the fabric! Very beautiful..great job!
    Angela
    www.sewloquacious.blogspot.com

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  16. Very pretty blouse. Love the polka dots!

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  17. That is a super-fantastic little blouse. Maybe you'll make the long sleeve version in the winter? Very cute.

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  18. Beautiful top. Beangirl is hysterical! g

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  19. Can I join the cheer squad too. Lovely soft voile, simply summer.

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  20. Valerie Hill11:26 PM

    Hi, Angie (that's my sister's name - what are the odds?)
    I've never commented on your blog before, but I did notice that you and I have two things in common: Oklahoma and vintage women's clothes, which is why I thought you might be interested in something. I entered this nation-wide contest, recently, in which people dress up in vintage styles ('60s, in this case), and the public votes on who has the best picture. I entered because I want the nation to see that Oklahoma is not lacking in fashion or style. I would appreciate it so so much if you told other vintage-loving ladies - especially fellow Oklahomans - about my entry. I would really love to get the entire state involved. :) My picture is at: http://madmencastingcall.amctv.com/browse/detail/Z5LT8Z
    Thank you so much,

    Valerie Hill (Stillwater)

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  21. Anonymous10:41 PM

    But how did you do the sleeve as the pattern for the view you did shows a little girlish puff sleeve and yours looks nothing like that. I bought bunch vintage patterns I'm contemplating making but I don't know that I know how to alter it, if I alter it to make it more modern then is there as much a point to using a vintage pattern? Without the funny puff sleeve in the photo I would not know this blouse was supposed to be vintage. So do I just use vintage patterns to tweak them in away to wear them today or do I stay exactly true to the pattern and make it the way it was supposed to be then? I'm not saying I don't like it, but that sleeve is nowhere in the pattern and how would a beginner like me be able to even do that?

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  22. @Anonymous: I used the exact sleeve pattern that is in the package, the little puffy "girly" sleeve. I just left out the elastic from the hem. You can do it! I promise it's not as hard. But also, you're right in assuming sometimes you can swap out another pattern piece (I think that's what you were saying). Especially if it's a gathered or pleated sleeve, usually you can manipulate it to fit into a different pattern's armhole. :)

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